Is This A Demonstrative Pronoun?

When can I use this and that?

Generally speaking, we use this/these to refer to people and things, situations and experiences that are close to the speaker or very close in time.

We use that/those to refer to people and things, situations and experiences that are more distant, either in time or physically..

What are the 12 personal pronouns?

In Modern English the personal pronouns include: “I,” “you,” “he,” “she,” “it,” “we,” “they,” “them,” “us,” “him,” “her,” “his,” “hers,” “its,” “theirs,” “our,” “your.” Personal pronouns are used in statements and commands, but not in questions; interrogative pronouns (like “who,” “whom,” “what”) are used there.

How do you teach demonstrative pronouns?

Lesson Procedure:Introduce the demonstrative pronouns. … Arrange the board with structures. … Play “All around the classroom” … Play the “this, that, these, those board game” … Do the “this, that, these, those 1” worksheet. … Read classroom reader “The Secret Cave” … Play “Run and touch the object”

How many types of demonstrative pronouns are there?

five demonstrative pronounsThere are five demonstrative pronouns in English: this, that, these, those, and the less common yon or yonder (the latter is usually employed as a demonstrative determiner; even so it is rarely used in most dialects of English, although it persists in some dialects such as Southern American English).

What is demonstrative pronoun and examples?

Pronouns that point to specific things: this, that, these, and those, as in “This is an apple,” “Those are boys,” or “Take these to the clerk.” The same words are used as demonstrative adjectives when they modify nouns or pronouns: “this apple,” “those boys.”

What are the 4 demonstrative pronouns?

Four Important Words: This, That, These, and Those These four words can serve as demonstrative pronouns or as demonstrative adjectives. We have four demonstrative pronouns in our language: this and that and their plurals these and those.

What type of pronoun is this?

Other Types of PronounPronoun TypeMembers of the SubclassReflexivemyself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, oneself, ourselves, yourselves, themselvesReciprocaleach other, one anotherRelativethat, which, who, whose, whom, where, whenDemonstrativethis, that, these, those3 more rows

What are this and that in grammar?

from English Grammar Today. This, that, these and those are demonstratives. We use this, that, these and those to point to people and things. This and that are singular. These and those are plural.

What is that considered in grammar?

from English Grammar Today. That is a very common word in both writing and speaking. We use it as a determiner, a demonstrative pronoun and a relative pronoun. We also use it as a conjunction to introduce that-clauses.

What is the vocabulary?

Vocabulary is all about words — the words in a language or a special set of words you are trying to learn. … First used in the 1500s to mean a list of words with explanations, the noun vocabulary came to refer to the “range of language of a person or group” about two hundred years later.

What is difference between demonstrative adjective and demonstrative pronoun?

Demonstrative Pronoun vs. A demonstrative pronoun takes the place of a noun phrase that has already been mentioned. … A demonstrative adjective modifies the noun and is always followed by the noun. (It always comes efore the noun.)

What type of word is this in grammar?

The word “this” can be used for a variety of purposes and contexts. Basically, it can be classified as an adjective, a definite article, a pronoun, or an adverb depending on how it is used. “THIS” can be categorized under adjectives if it is used to describe a noun.

What is the word very in grammar?

Very can be used in the following ways: as an adverb (before adjectives and adverbs): It had been a long day and he was very tired. … as an adjective (only before a noun): They went down to the very bottom of the sea.

What is a demonstrative in grammar?

In grammar, a demonstrative is a determiner or a pronoun that points to a particular noun or to the noun it replaces. There are four demonstratives in English: the “near” demonstratives this and these, and the “far” demonstratives that and those. This and that are singular; these and those are plural.

What does demonstrative mean in grammar?

noun. Definition of demonstrative (Entry 2 of 2) grammar. : a word or morpheme pointing out the one referred to and distinguishing it from others of the same class : a demonstrative (see demonstrative entry 1 sense 2) word or morpheme the demonstratives “this,” “that,” “these,” and “those”

What is the difference between this and that?

The words ‘this’ and ‘that’ are demonstrative pronoun which is used for indicating something. We use the word ‘this’ to point out a person or object which is close to you. … On the other hand, ‘that’ is used to point out a person or an object which is farther from you.

What kind of pronoun is me?

Personal pronouns take the place of people or things. They can be either singular or plural, depending whether they refer to one or multiple nouns. Examples include I, me, we, and us. Personal pronouns are usually either the subject of a sentence or an object within a sentence.

Are this and that pronouns?

That, this, these and those are demonstrative pronouns. They take the place of a noun or noun phrase that has already been mentioned. This is used for singular items that are nearby. These is used for multiple items that are nearby.

What is the example of demonstrative?

ExamplesNear the speakerFar from the speakerThis is a nice surprise!That must have been a nice surprise for you.These apples are mine.Those apples are yours.What are you up to these days?Those days are long gone.This time I won’t be late.We really surprised you that time.2 more rows

What is the word this?

adjective. English Language Learners Definition of this (Entry 2 of 3) —used to indicate the person, thing, or idea that is present or near in place, time, or thought or that has just been mentioned. —used to indicate the thing that is closest to you or that is being shown to you.

What are the 10 types of pronoun?

Personal Pronouns, Reflexive Pronouns, Emphatic Pronouns, Reciprocal Pronouns, Demonstrative Pronouns, Indefinite Pronouns, Interrogative Pronouns, Relative Pronouns, Distributive Pronouns, Exclamatory Pronouns.